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SQL Server Connections

SQL Server Connections offers thorough, complex and comprehensive sessions that:

  • Demonstrate how to get the most out of your SQL Server installations as you face ever-increasing demands for performance and availability
  • Avoid common SQL Server problems with emphasis on real-world lessons for T-SQL, security, monitoring, performance tuning, SQL Server Reporting Services, SQL Server Integration Services, database development, and much more.
  • Are delivered by the industry’s best experts with proven, real-world experience.

Consistently, past attendees’ SQL Server performance, availability and overall management needs have improved after they attended SQL Server Connections. Attend this year and immediately see the impact on your SQL Server, your stress and your personal performance!

 

Session Details:


Session Description Speaker Format
T-SQL Querying and Query Tuning Enhancements in the Latest Major Releases of SQL Server As a DBA or database developer, you typically undergo a number of learning phases when it comes to new T-SQL features. You usually start by learning the logical aspects of the feature, then practical uses and optimization. With time, you identify best practices, discover more advanced aspects of optimization, and find more creative ways to use the feature. The more experience you have with a feature, the more interesting uses you discover. Great examples are the APPLY operator and the ROW_NUMBER function. The newer the feature, the more discoveries that are still being realized. Good examples are the new and enhanced window functions. This seminar covers querying and query tuning enhancements in the latest major releases of SQL Server concerning new T-SQL features such as window functions, sequences, OFFSET/FETCH, MERGE, grouping sets, date and time types and functions, APPLY, pivoting and unpivoting, CTEs, indexing improvements, and others. Itzik
Ben-Gan
Workshop
SQL Server 2012 in a Highly Available World In this day-long session, we will explore the various high availability options within SQL Server 2012, including how to configure these options. We'll look at Windows and SQL Server clustering (including what's needed for a geographically dispersed cluster), database mirroring, SQL Server 2012's AlwaysOn feature, and SQL Server log shipping. Denny Cherry Workshop
Practical Performance Monitoring in SQL Server Do you know what counters, statistics, events, and other information you should be collecting on a regular basis to properly monitor your SQL Server instances? Do you know where your current bottlenecks really are or how to even look for them? Are you proactive or reactive when it comes to performance? In this session, we will cover the key areas to monitor regarding the database, server, and hardware to get the biggest bang for your buck. See how a little bit of effort up front can lead to a much better understanding of your database environment and put you in a great position to spot potential issues before they become real trouble. Each of the scripts and demos can be utilized immediately in your own environment. You will come away with a fundamental understanding of the most common bottlenecks affecting SQL Server performance and have a much better foothold on tackling the issues that you find. Andrew Kelly Workshop
SSIS Design Patterns In this day-long seminar, Andy Leonard discusses and demonstrates many SSIS design patterns, from his book SQL Server 2012 Integration Services Design Patterns. Topics include execution patterns, scripting in SSIS, designing custom tasks, connection and configuration management, events and event listeners, data integration instrumentation, change detection patterns, lookup patterns, and data integration automation. Andy Leonard Workshop
From Reporting Services Rookie to Rock Star This session provides an introduction to SQL Server Reporting Services (SSRS) for report developers who have no prior experience with the product. We explain how to use the development tools effectively, how to present and enhance data in a report, and how to create dynamic reports. Even if you already have some experience with SSRS, this session explores aspects of SSRS that are unintuitive and aren't well-documented, providing you with the opportunity to expand your skills and make the most of the reporting tool. In a jam-packed day of discussions and demonstrations applicable to SQL Server 2008 and later, you'll learn how to use a tablix effectively to design the layout of data with creative groupings, how to use expressions to display data or change the behavior of a report in practical ways, how to use report parameters with and without query parameters, how to use data visualization features, how to add interactivity to reports, and more! Stacia Misner Workshop
How Active Directory Affects SQL Server If you've ever had a Kerberos or SSPI context error, then you won't want to miss this session. SQL Server has a large surface area, and Active Directory can influence a big part of it. We will discuss AD DNS configuration, Group Policy Objects, Kerberos (of course), and how all of them affect SQL Server. By the end of the session you'll have a checklist of things to discuss with your domain administrator when you return to work. Ryan Adams Session
Manage Your Shop with CMS and Policy Based Management In this SQLRally #3-rated session, we will discuss Central Management Server and how it can help you manage a diverse environment. We'll also discuss policy-based management and how you can leverage its power to better manage your environment. We'll see what policy-based management can (and can't) do to help you enforce standards in your enterprise—we'll include a demonstration of policy-based management all the way from creating and evaluating policies to receiving alerts on policy violations. Ryan Adams Session
Inside the Query Optimizer When it comes to SQL Server, one of the biggest requests you hear is "How can I make my queries run faster?" The first step in that process is understanding the Query Optimizer—which begins with knowing the rules. The way our queries are written directly affects our output. In this session, we will look at the rules in SQL Server, write queries to show those rules in action, and gain a better understanding of how the SQL Server Query Optimizer works. Bradley Ball Session
Data Internals Deep Dive DBAs tend to approach their jobs in a backward fashion—from databases to tables to the data in those tables. A better approach is to start at the bottom and build your way up. In this session, you'll learn about records, stored on pages, grouped in extents, assigned by allocation bitmaps, with Index Allocation Map (IAM) pages and allocation units that span partitions and file groups. We'll cover byte swapping and bitmaps, and we'll touch on decoding hex and binary. You'll come away with a full understanding of database internals. Bradley Ball Session
Efficient Interval Management in SQL Server An interval represents a set of values between some low and some high values. In reality, there are different kinds of intervals that you might need to represent in your database, such as temporal (e.g., sessions, appointments, periods of validity). To represent temporal intervals in SQL Server, most people use two attributes holding the lower and upper points in time. You also might need to detect relations between intervals, such as overlap (e.g., "return all contracts that were active during an input period represented by the inputs @lower and @upper"). Some of the classic querying methods that are used to provide answers for such requests suffer from fundamental optimization problems. This session explains the existing optimization problems, presents solutions for those problems that can be applied in SQL Server, and describes the potential for additions to SQL Server that could improve interval treatment in the future. Itzik
Ben-Gan
Session
Practical Uses of Window Functions Window functions allow you to perform data analysis computations elegantly and efficiently. Support for window functions was added in two major milestones. SQL Server 2005 introduced ranking and limited aggregate window functions, and SQL Server 2012 enhanced aggregate window functions with framing options, as well as introduced offset and statistical window functions. This session first explains the design of window functions and then covers practical uses of the functions, demonstrating how you can use them to address business challenges. Itzik
Ben-Gan
Session
Use Dynamic Management Views to Diagnose SQL Server Performance Issues Dynamic Management Views (DMVs) and functions allow you to easily see exactly what's happening inside your SQL Server instances and databases with a high level of detail. You can discover your top wait types, identify the most CPU-intensive stored procedures, find missing indexes, and identify unused indexes, to name just a few examples. This session presents, demonstrates, and explains numerous DMV queries that you can quickly and easily use to detect and diagnose configuration and performance issues in your SQL Server instances and databases. Glenn Berry Session
Hardware 201: Selecting and Sizing Database Hardware for OLTP Performance The foundation of database performance is the underlying server hardware and storage subsystem. Even the best-designed and optimized database application can be crippled by an inadequate hardware and storage infrastructure. Recent advances in new processors and chipsets, along with improvements in magnetic and SSD storage, have dramatically changed the evaluation and selection process. Many database professionals struggle to keep up with new technology and often simply let someone else make their hardware selection and sizing decisions. Unfortunately, the DBA usually gets the blame for any performance issues that crop up later. Don't let this happen to you! This session covers current and upcoming hardware from both Intel and AMD and gives you the tools and resources to make better hardware selection decisions to support SQL Server OLTP workloads. Glenn Berry Session
SQL Server Transaction Log Internals The transaction log plays the most critical role in any SQL Server database. In this session, we discuss the importance of the transaction log and the roles it plays inside the database engine. We look at how logging and recovery work, the checkpoint process, write-ahead logging, and steps you need to take as a DBA to ensure proper management of the transaction log for a SQL Server database. Tim Chapman Session
SQL Server Index Internals Proper indexing is critical to every SQL Server installation. Having the correct indexes is imperative; having the incorrect or excessive indexes can be detrimental to system performance. This session will dig deep into what a SQL Server index is, when to choose a specific index, and what those indexes are actually doing inside the engine. Tim Chapman Session
Table Indexing for the .NET Developer In this session, we will discuss best and worst practices for indexing tables within your SQL Server 2000-2012 databases. We'll also look into the new indexing features available in SQL Server 2012 (and SQL Server 2005/2008) and how .NET developers can best use these features to get their code running optimally. Denny Cherry Session
SQL Server Table Partitioning from the Ground Up In this session, we will explore the SQL Server table partitioning features that were introduced in SQL Server 2008. We'll look at how to create partitioned tables and indexes, as well as the internals of the table. We'll also discuss how to move data from one partition to another and from one table to another with minimal to no impact on users. Understanding these techniques will help you improve query performance and reduce downtime when loading and pruning data. Denny Cherry Session
Using Power View and Hadoop to Unlock Hidden Markets A practical way to derive business value from big data is to micro-target customers—but where do you begin? In this session, we will examine real data from one of the nation's largest cable TV providers and combine it with data from the 2010 census and other data sources. Then we'll walk through a demonstration of how to use Hadoop and the Microsoft BI stack with this integrated data to quickly and easily develop powerful analytics. We'll demystify the process of working with big data by showing you first how to gather and load the data into Hadoop, and then how to extract a subset of that data and apply data visualization to reveal insightful patterns that you can use to connect more effectively with customers. Joseph D'Antoni
&
Stacia Misner
Session
Build Your Own SQL Server Private Cloud Do you know what SaaS and DaaS are? If not, you should. SQL Server as a Service (SaaS) and Database as a Service (DaaS) are otherwise known as the private cloud—the ability to offer your customers (external or internal) a reliable, scalable, and manageable way to easily deploy SQL Server systems and databases. Customers simply want to push a button and get what they asked for, which is what the private cloud experience should allow them to do. Even if you're already in the cloud, learn how to take it to the next level and design a service offering that will increase your organization's agility. Ben DeBow Session
Surviving Your Peak Database Load Each application and system is different, but they all have a similar quality: There will be times when the systems are used more, and other times when they might appear to be sleeping. Good examples are monthly, quarterly, and yearly for financial systems and the holiday season for retail. The last thing you want during these timeframes is to have your CxO standing at your desk wondering why things are slow or possibly down. Ensuring that your SQL Server systems are optimally configured for heavy usage periods requires an actionable, realistic plan. This session will discuss how to guarantee that your SQL Server instances and the configurations they use are as scalable and reliable as possible. Ben DeBow Session
Troubleshooting SQL Server with SysInternals Tools In this demo-packed session, we will explore the use of SysInternals tools such as Process Monitor, Process Explorer, and many others to troubleshoot various problem scenarios with SQL Server. This session isn't for the faint of heart and is tailored toward those adventurous DBAs who often like to step out of their comfort zone. A fair knowledge of Windows OS internals is recommended. Argenis Fernandez Session
Code-Less Securing of SQL Server Learn from a Microsoft Certified Master how to secure your SQL Server infrastructure and your Windows installations to enhance resiliency and minimize exposure to attacks—all without touching any of your code! Argenis Fernandez Session
Shortcuts to Productivity in SQL Server Management Studio SQL Server professionals spend most of their time in a single tool: SQL Server Management Studio (SSMS)—so it makes sense to make the most of what the tool has to offer. In this session, we will explore how to use templates and snippets in SSMS to maximize code reuse and present a readily available script library inside SQL's native tool that doesn't require a third-party solution. Tim Ford Session
From Zero to Hero: A Case Study in Reducing Extremely High I/O on a SQL Server System Confronted with the highest I/O of any Windows server in our environment, one intrepid DBA was able to reduce I/O, space consumption, and blocking to new lows. This case study is based on actual events, with the names of the innocent as well as the guilty changed to protect the DBA. Topics covered include Dynamic Management Views (DMVs), online operations, file groups, page compression, and disk formatting best practices. Tim Ford Session
SQL Server Optimization: Tuning the Hardware Subsystems You can't escape hardware or the laws of physics! Ultimately, your SQL Server instance will be using the processor, memory, disk, and network subsystems. In this session, we will go through the various subsystems and examine how the SQL Server database engine works with them. Along the way, we'll discuss how to tune the hardware, the Windows operating system, and SQL Server for optimal performance. You'll immediately benefit from this extremely practical session. Victor Isakov Session
What DBAs Need to Know About Hekaton Hekaton, Microsoft's new "in-memory tables" architecture in SQL Server, promises to seriously change the type of database solutions that you need to architect and administer. In this session, we will examine this new technology's architecture and internals, new T-SQL syntax, and various use cases. We'll then discuss how it affects your SQL Server environment, including performance considerations, troubleshooting, administration, and high-availability design considerations. Victor Isakov Session
Using FullText Search with Office Documents and PDFs Extracting information from your Office documents and PDFs is easy with SQL Server's FileTable and FullText Search features. This session will cover the implementation and configuration needed to begin integrating more extensive search features into your applications. Steve Jones Session
Encryption in SQL Server Securing your data is becoming increasingly important for data professionals. This session will cover the encryption features available in SQL Server to help you better secure data. Transparent Data Encryption, symmetric keys, asymmetric keys, and hashing functions will be covered in a number of demos. Steve Jones Session
Collecting and Analyzing File and Wait Statistics Is your SQL Server instance running at peak performance level? Probably not—but the real question is, why not? Is your disk subsystem too slow, are you lacking enough CPUs, or is it something else? Dynamic Management Views (DMVs) make it easy to capture and analyze the file and wait statistical information that's automatically provided by the SQL Server instance—so why not use them? In this session, we will explore how you can stop chasing your tail and focus on which SQL Server performance bottlenecks are causing the most harm. This knowledge should be part of every DBA's arsenal—so come make it part of yours as well. Andrew Kelly Session
Maximizing Plan Reuse To get peak performance from your SQL Server instance, you need to ensure that the majority of your database calls reuse a previously compiled query plan. Lack of proper plan reuse can add an enormous amount of overhead to your system and can affect overall performance. We will start with an overview of how the plan cache works, which will help you identify the existing plans that aren't being reused—and more importantly, we'll show you how to reverse that behavior. Finally, we'll explore several options for dealing with situations in which you might not have control over how calls are made to the database. Andrew Kelly Session
Practical Performance Monitoring in SQL Server Do you know what counters, statistics, events, and other information you should be collecting on a regular basis to properly monitor your SQL Server instances? Do you know where your current bottlenecks really are or how to even look for them? Are you proactive or reactive when it comes to performance? In this session, we will cover the key areas to monitor regarding the database, server, and hardware to get the biggest bang for your buck. See how a little bit of effort up front can lead to a much better understanding of your database environment and put you in a great position to spot potential issues before they become real trouble. Each of the scripts and demos can be utilized immediately in your own environment. You will come away with a fundamental understanding of the most common bottlenecks affecting SQL Server performance and have a much better foothold on tackling the issues that you find. Andrew Kelly Session
Windows Azure SQL Database Troubleshooting and Query Tuning Windows Azure SQL Database is a fully managed, scalable service based on SQL Server technology. It's also a shared-environment service, which means that you can't and shouldn't avoid best practices when it comes to query tuning. Microsoft has put mechanisms in place to ensure that your queries and processes don't use too many resources, which could seriously affect performance of not only your database but also the databases of other organizations. This demo-filled session will look at some tools and options to help identify poorly performing queries, such as Dynamic Management Views (DMVs). This session will help you identify problem queries and help you understand why a query is running slowly through execution plans and other tools in the SQL Database portal. You'll learn how to find and fix poorly performing queries and do it all in the cloud. Scott Klein Session
Windows Azure SQL Database for the DBA Windows Azure SQL Database is a fully managed, scalable service based on SQL Server technology. However, "fully-managed" doesn't necessarily mean that many or all of the DBA's tasks and responsibilities are managed and executed by Microsoft or the service itself. The DBA is still crucial in Windows Azure SQL Database. In this session, we will take a look at the all-important role of the DBA when working with Windows Azure SQL Database, and we'll explore how many of a DBA's on-premises functions, tasks, and responsibilities are accomplished in a cloud environment—specifically Windows Azure SQL Database. This session will also look at the tips, tricks, and best practices a DBA should know in order to accomplish similar on-premises tasks in the cloud. Scott Klein Session
Make Your Queries Fly With Columnstore Indexes Do you want to speed up your reports over large tables by 10x, 20x, or even 50x or more? These are the performance improvements columnstore indexes can give you, if used properly. Often touted as a "BI" feature, in reality columnstore indexes can benefit any workload that involves some sort of reporting on very large tables. In this session, we will first discuss the basics of how columnstore indexes work. Then we'll dive in and get dirty, looking at how to rewrite existing queries and change database designs to get the most out of this new index type. If you're running SQL Server 2012, you can add a columnstore index to your large tables and gain maybe 4x performance—or you can attend this session and make things really fly. Hugo Kornelis Session
Using BIML as an SSIS Design Patterns Engine Business Intelligence Markup Language (BIML) provides a powerful solution for creating and managing SSIS design patterns. In this session, Andy Leonard, one of the authors of SQL Server 2012 Integration Services Design Patterns, demonstrates the flexibility of BIML. Andy Leonard Session
Hacking the SSIS 2012 Catalog SQL Server Integration Services 2012 offers a brand-new way to store, log, and execute SSIS packages: the SSIS Catalog. How does the Catalog work? Can it be customized? Can it be extended? Yes it can! In this presentation, Andy Leonard shows you how. Andy Leonard Session
SSIS Design Patterns In this day-long seminar, Andy Leonard discusses and demonstrates many SSIS design patterns, from his book SQL Server 2012 Integration Services Design Patterns. Topics include execution patterns, scripting in SSIS, designing custom tasks, connection and configuration management, events and event listeners, data integration instrumentation, change detection patterns, lookup patterns, and data integration automation. Andy Leonard Session
Reduce, Reuse, Recycle: Automating Your BI Framework Some aspects of building out a BI solution are quite tedious. As you cycle through iterations of your star schema, you'll find that even a simple data type change in the data warehouse schema requires you to make corresponding changes to staging tables, SSIS packages, and SSAS multidimensional and tabular models that take a considerable amount of time to implement. But there's a better, faster way! In this session, we explore lessons learned from a project that required implementation of a framework to easily generate BI objects based on reusable patterns. We walk through decision points in the framework design, review implementation steps, and demonstrate the ease with which you can make iterative changes to the design of your BI solution. Whether you simply want to accelerate your change management process or reproduce objects in bulk on demand, this session will give you practical tips for automating these processes. Stacia Misner Session
BI Security Best Practices How secure is your BI environment? The Microsoft BI stack contains multiple tools that each have different security configuration options and interdependencies. This session starts with a review of the security architecture of each component in the BI stack and highlights vulnerabilities in the architecture that must be addressed to properly secure your BI environment. In this session, you'll also learn about the relationship across the security settings in the BI tools, back-end databases, and Windows operating system. Building on this foundation, you'll learn what steps are necessary to apply security best practices in each component of the Microsoft BI stack. Stacia Misner Session
From Reporting Services Rookie to Rock Star This session provides an introduction to SQL Server Reporting Services (SSRS) for report developers who have no prior experience with the product. We explain how to use the development tools effectively, how to present and enhance data in a report, and how to create dynamic reports. Even if you already have some experience with SSRS, this session explores aspects of SSRS that are unintuitive and aren't well-documented, providing you with the opportunity to expand your skills and make the most of the reporting tool. In a jam-packed day of discussions and demonstrations applicable to SQL Server 2008 and later, you'll learn how to use a tablix effectively to design the layout of data with creative groupings, how to use expressions to display data or change the behavior of a report in practical ways, how to use report parameters with and without query parameters, how to use data visualization features, how to add interactivity to reports, and more! Stacia Misner Session
Maximizing SSIS Package Performance So you've developed a whiz-bang SQL Server Integration Services (SSIS) package to push around a bunch of data. You save it, run it, and . . . nothing happens—or it moves very slowly. Or perhaps you have packages that run reasonably well, but you're convinced they could run faster. Where do you start troubleshooting? How do you eliminate those performance pain points? In this demo-packed session, we will work through some of the most common causes of performance bottlenecks in SSIS packages, along with recommended practices for maximizing performance. Some of the topics we'll cover include troubleshooting methods to detect performance hotspots, optimizing sources and destinations for maximum throughput, choosing the most efficient data flow transformations, and using parallelism to improve performance. Tim Mitchell Session
Cleaning Up Dirty Data in SSIS Dirty data is everywhere, and it's headed for a database near you. Extraction, transformation, and loading (ETL) can be difficult, but often the most challenging component of that process is the validation and cleanup of data. Information must be cleansed in such a way that it retains its original message and business value, while conforming to the expectations of the destination system(s). In this session, we will discuss some design patterns for addressing different types of dirty data using SQL Server Integration Services (SSIS). We'll review the various cleansing tools accessible from within SSIS, including native Integration Services components, T-SQL, and SSIS scripting. In addition, we'll briefly review the new SQL Server Data Quality Services and its integration with SSIS. We'll cap off the discussion with demonstrations of several methods for data cleansing. Tim Mitchell Session
Choosing Between SSAS 2012 Multidimensional and Tabular The SQL Server Analysis Services (SSAS) 2012 Business Intelligence Semantic Model (BISM) unifies multidimensional (OLAP) and tabular (relational) options for organizational BI. BI professionals can implement multidimensional cubes, or they can deploy tabular models, developed by business users, to a dedicated server. Those new to tabular or those embarking upon BI for the first time with SSAS 2012 might find it difficult to choose between the two paths. In this session, we explore the nature and design goals of each option, comparing multidimensional and tabular features. We also offer guidance for selecting the appropriate model, with real-world examples that illustrate approaches for given scenarios. William Pearson Session
PowerPivot to SSAS 2012 Tabular In this session, we will discuss the steps required to upgrade an Excel PowerPivot model to a SQL Server Analysis Services (SSAS) 2012 tabular model using SQL Server Data Tools (SSDT). We'll discuss motivations behind moving to SSAS 2012 tabular, including PowerPivot model size challenges for the client environment, from the perspective of both processing and query optimization. We'll then walk through the steps necessary to convert a model designed in PowerPivot to a server-level tabular model. William Pearson Session
Managing SQL Server Performance with Extended Events One of a DBA's primary responsibilities is managing the performance of a SQL Server environment. When performance problems arise, DBAs need to have the correct tools in place to be able to dig in and discover the issues that are occurring. Although it's one of the newer tools in the DBA toolbox, Extended Events is one of the most powerful tools available. In this session, we will discuss performance management responsibilities for DBAs and provide a foundation, through Extended Events, to understand and resolve performance issues. Jason Strate Session
Leveraging the Plan Cache for Performance Tuning In today's environments, DBAs often deal with dozens of servers and hundreds of databases. Often, a DBA finds a single performance tuning problem and wonders, "Is this happening elsewhere?" and "Is it happening there more often?" In this session, we will answer those questions by demonstrating how to search SQL Server's plan cache for patterns of performance issues. By the end of the session, you'll be armed with a process for expanding your performance tuning skills and queries that you can immediately bring back to your environment. Jason Strate Session
Improve the Performance of Your T-SQL Queries by Changing Your Habits Do you dread handing your T-SQL code over for review? Do your queries run slower than you expect? Does the DBA always want to tweak your code? In this demo-heavy session, we will take a look at various ways to improve your T-SQL code. You'll learn about formatting T-SQL for readability and why top-down design isn't the best approach to writing T-SQL. You'll learn why implicit conversions slow down queries and how to leverage simple techniques to minimize the performance effect of explicit conversions. You'll also learn how to use set theory to improve performance. By changing some of your T-SQL writing habits, you can improve the performance of queries from the very beginning. Mickey Stuewe Session
Creating SSRS Reports Efficiently Through Best Practices You always have more report requests than you can possibly fulfill. Wouldn't it be great if you could speed up the generation of reports? Templates can streamline the life cycle of a report for the whole team. In this session, you'll learn how templates in your tool belt can help you efficiently gather requirements, quickly design mockups, and standardize the look and feel of your SSRS reports. Reports don't stop changing once they're released into production, and some reports are phased out over time. Wouldn't it be great to have a way to keep track of the changes a report takes on in production over time? We'll talk about how to keep track of change requests, how to analyze the utilization of existing reports, and how to track changes in users for the reports in production. Mickey Stuewe Session
Manage SQL Server Efficiently with PowerShell Remoting You have more servers to manage and less time to do so. You're writing scripts to automate management tasks, but the scripts still take time to run. PowerShell remoting allows you to manage servers without the overhead of Remote Desktop, and it lets you run processes on all your servers simultaneously. In this session, we will walk through how PowerShell remoting works, how to set it up, and how it can help you save time. Allen White Session
Manage SQL Server 2012 on Windows Server Core with PowerShell Windows Server 2008 introduced Server Core, the operating system without a GUI. SQL Server 2012 is the first version of SQL Server to support Server Core. Using Server Core helps you gain maximum efficiency from your servers, and PowerShell can help you effectively manage SQL Server in a Server Core environment. This session will demonstrate how to manage SQL Server 2012 on Windows Server Core and will provide PowerShell scripts to help you perform common Server Core tasks. Allen White Session
TempDB Performance Troubleshooting and Optimizing Every SQL Server instance relies on the tempdb database. Whether through explicit use with #temp tables or @table variables, or implicit use through working space for many other operations, most tempdb databases get quite a workout. This session will dig into many of the hidden issues that can kill server performance. Learn how to spot tempdb performance issues, drill into the cause, and take the steps necessary to solve the problem. Eddie Wuerch Session
Page Latches for Mere Mortals Latching is a necessary function of the database engine. Although latching is a topic typically presented only in expert-level sessions, even novice tuners need a good grasp of the problems created by excessive latching. This session focuses on the PAGELATCH_* and PAGEIOLATCH_* wait types, explaining what's happening, why it's happening, and how to use the exposed information to tune queries and solve performance problems. If you've seen these wait types in Activity Monitor and wondered what they meant, this session is for you! Eddie Wuerch Session

 *schedule subject to change

 

TimeTuesdayWednesdayThursday
7:30am - 8:30am

Breakfast

8:30am - 9:30am

Keynote

9:30am - 10:00am

Break

10:00am - 11:15am

3 - 4 Sessions

3 - 4 Sessions

3 - 4 Sessions

11:15am - 11:45am

Break

11:45am - 1:00pm

3 - 4 Sessions

3 - 4 Sessions

3 - 4 Sessions

1:00pm - 2:30pm

Lunch

2:30pm - 3:45pm

3 - 4 Sessions

3 - 4 Sessions

3 - 4 Sessions

3:45pm - 4:15pm

Break

4:15pm - 5:30pm

3 - 4 Sessions

3 - 4 Sessions

3 - 4 Sessions

5:30pm - 7:30pm
Welcome
Reception
  

 

 *schedule subject to change

 

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